Cultural Footprint

Our cultural footprint is integrated into our identity. It is something we can all relate, learn and aspire to.

Cultural Footprint Japanese Diaspora

Crafting Connections: Nordic design and Japanese Folk Art Movement

A limited edition book turi showcasing the work of Turi Gramstad Oliver, a prominent figure in Nordic design, was released. The book includes works inspired by Japanese artists, who led the Mingei movement, and Japanese culture. Turi Gramstad Oliver is a prominent Norwegian artist who has been active since the mid-20th century. Last summer in Norway, a design book Turi was released, chronicling Turi’s lifetime of creative work. The book includes over 500 illustrations and photographs, along with archival images, anecdotes, and insights into her personal life shared with fellow creative collaborators. It was written by Torunn Larsen, a writer and art historian. Why the World Can’t Have Enough of Norwegian Product

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Cultural Footprint Me Time Guide

The 5 Luxury Classic Onsen in the Northeast: The Perfect Destinations for Solos

Japan has an ancient custom in traditionally taking hot baths. People in Japan customarily like to go to public bathhouses. There are many different types and varieties of bathhouses. Some use tap water in their baths which is typically called Sentō(銭湯). In contrast, bathhouses that utilize a natural hot spring, are called Onsen(温泉). In particular, a trip to an onsen is one of the most popular activities for modern Japanese people. We will reveal some of the special places that hot spring fans truly enjoy during their trips in Japan. Touji(湯治), means “hot spring cure”. It refers to visiting a resort that possesses a natural hot spring. It typically requires

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Cultural Footprint Me Time Guide

The Epic & Ultimate Pilgrimage: Ise Jingu for Solo Travelers

One of the most famous Japanese sightseeing pilgrimages for Japanese and foreigners is the Ise Jingu Shrine, located in Ise city, Mie Prefecture. Ise Jingu is a Shinto shrine that represents the country and is preserved by the imperial family. There are an amazing 125 Shinto shrines within Ise Jingo. Two of the two main shrines are Naiku and Geku. Naiku means inner shrine, the most venerable sanctuary in Japan. Within Naiku is a Shinto shrine dedicated to Amaterasu-Omikami, the ancestral Shinto deity of the Imperial family. She was enshrined in Naiku about 2,000 years ago and has been revered as a guard of Japan. Geku, the other main shrine,

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Cultural Footprint Table For One

The History of the Japanese Table For One

In Japan, the Edo period between 1603 to 1868 was a representative era of modern Japanese culture, and the history of Table For One was already in full bloom. Under the stable political system of the Edo period, many citizens became economically prosperous, and thus, the food/restaurant industry was emerging along with the development of the urban economy. During this development, eating habits changed from 2 meals a day to 3 meals a day. Dishes such as sushi, soba, tempura, and unagi (eel) were sold at food stands as fast-food service which suited the people of Edo’s busy lifestyle. Also, certain restaurants which were called Izakaya and Teishokuya (another name

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Cultural Footprint

Creative Halloween Costumes Inspired by the Japanese 19th Century

Halloween is a Western culture, and it has been gaining mass participation in Japan, especially among the youth. In 1997, Tokyo Disneyland held the “Disney Happy Halloween” costume event, which led to the spread of this celebration in the country. It is said that the Disneyland event began Halloween to take roots in Japan, after candy manufacturers and apparel stores began to sell Halloween items. The original meaning of the concept of Halloween has almost been lost in this country, and it has become a more “costume event”. Many Japanese say that this is because Japan has had a cosplay culture since the Edo period (1603 – 1867). There seems

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Cultural Footprint Japanese Diaspora Life Style

South Korean Literature Brings Hope & Empowerment: K-book Store in Tokyo Chekccori

South Korean literature is increasingly popular amid the fourth wave of the Hallyu boom. Kim Seung-bok, who founded Cuon, a publishing company specializing in South Korean content, possesses a wide range of literary works. South Korea is considered both geographically the closest and yet one of the most distant countries from Japan due to its historical conflicts and divergent political views. On the other hand, there are many Japanese who enjoy visiting the country on vacation.  The younger Japanese generation is drawn to the Korean lifestyles and values through their exposure to K-pop, K-dramas, and movies. It is not surprising to encounter Japanese students, who diligently follow South Korean culture

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Cultural Footprint Me Time Guide

Discover a Better Connection of You, Best Hiking Destinations

Mountains have long served a major role in people’s lives, providing water, food, and housing materials such as woods and rocks. Throughout history, mountains have also been an integral part of many of the world’s religions. From the ancient times of Japanese mythology to the present day, mountains have been important, and many have become spiritual spots. Many Japanese people want to visit the pilgrimage sites in Japan at least once in their lifetime. The following list is two of the three most sacred mountains in Japan, Mt.Tate, and Mt.Haku. The other one is Japan’s highest mountain, Fuji. Characteristics of Female Salvation: Mt.Tate (Toyama Prefecture) The most distinctive feature of

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Cultural Footprint

Recharge Your Mind and Soul: Zen Hiking to Mt. Fuji

In Japan, roughly 70 percent of the country is mountainous. And in those areas, there are many major holy mountains. Climbing these sacred mountains of faith is called Zenjyo. People also refer to Zenyjo as the ultimate destination or the mountain summit. Since the Muromachi period (1336-1573), many people have begun to practice Zenjyo. The top 3 Japanese holy mountains are Fuji, Tate and Haku. Many Japanese Me Time lovers travel to these 3 sacred mountains at least once in their lives. Mt. Fuji is the most well-known Japanese peak in the world. This article will take you on a journey through the history and worship of Mount Fuji and its current

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Cultural Footprint

Amazing Travel Destinations That Will Enrich Your Life

In Japan, people of all ages and genders are climbing & hiking mountains alone. Some people who are not familiar with going to the mountains ask, “Isn’t it dangerous to walk alone in the mountains or nature?”. It is actually safe because there are many alone mountain climbers, especially on the weekends, from spring to early autumn. Some of the main reasons why people are climbing mountains alone include; they want to go during their own favorite time and own chosen places and; they want to hike at their own pace; hiking is considered a great way to enjoy self-reflection and is a peaceful method of personal meditation. Mountains Represent

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Cultural Footprint

Mindfulness Travel is the New Way to Refresh Our Health

What are your reasons to travel alone? For Japanese solo travelers, the reasons to travel alone are numerous and varying among individuals. Some of the main reasons include; they want to enjoy their time away from everyday life; this is a way to reward themselves; individuals want to travel at their favorite time without the inconvenience of someone else’s schedule. The adventurous travelers feel this the time/moment to do things they haven’t experienced before in their lives. In addition, by staying and interacting with the local indigenous people while traveling, the experience becomes authentic, educational, and rewarding. Today, it is not uncommon for women of all ages to travel alone,

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