Me Time Guide

Me Time TREND: Onsen Far From Tokyo

There is no surprise that Japan is great country for solo traveling. There are many solo dining spaces in cafes & restaurants, Manga cafes (24 hours internet cafes, with an extensive selection of comics and videos), capsule hotels, solo karaoke rooms and more! Most solo activities are very popular regardless of age and gender. Last time we talked about onsen & ryokan near Tokyo, this time we introduce you to travel to a little more distant/further places from Tokyo. A Hidden Onsen: Hoshi Onsen Chojukan_Gunma Prefecture People love traditional hot springs with warm hospitality, while getting tremendous value for great service at a very reasonable price. Hoshi Onsen has been

arrow_forward
Me Time Guide

Me Time TREND: Onsen Near Tokyo

During the last ten years, Me Time culture has become increasingly more popular in Japan. The top 3 Me Time trend activities in Japan are onsen, sauna, and camping. These activities provide specialized services for solo travelers. Before we introduce you to the sauna and camping trends in Tokyo we would like to talk about onsen. Because it’s an important aspect of Japanese traditional culture as well as a trending Me Time activity. What’s Onsen? Natural hot springs or onsens are fueled by volcanic activity. The minerals provide various health benefits, and have a relaxing effect on your body and mind. Many onsens are in ryokans (much more preferable and

arrow_forward
Life Style

Clear Your Mind, Breathe, and Stand on Your Feet

During the pandemic, it was virtually impossible to see what was going to happen in the near future. Some things were occurring at a blinding pace, and we simply did not have any control over certain situations. When our minds are in turmoil, a firm awareness of our feet as the center of our axis can actually help calm our thoughts and strengthen our minds. A Buddhist monk once told us that when our mind is in turmoil, we should be aware of the soles of our feet, to help feel and calm our own presence. “Feet on the ground” is a Japanese idiom meaning a stable, steady, and calm

arrow_forward
Cultural Footprint Table For One

The History of the Japanese Table For One

In Japan, the Edo period between 1603 to 1868 was a representative era of modern Japanese culture, and the history of Table For One was already in full bloom. Under the stable political system of the Edo period, many citizens became economically prosperous, and thus, the food/restaurant industry was emerging along with the development of the urban economy. During this development, eating habits changed from 2 meals a day to 3 meals a day. Dishes such as sushi, soba, tempura, and unagi (eel) were sold at food stands as fast-food service which suited the people of Edo’s busy lifestyle. Also, certain restaurants which were called Izakaya and Teishokuya (another name

arrow_forward
Table For One

Table for One in Japan: How to Enjoy Solo Dining

Ohitorisama means one person or Table For One. It has become a rapidly growing movement over the last ten years. There are an increasing number of mangas, TV drama series, and books about the Ohitorisama lifestyle. The solo life activities includes activities such as travel, camping, Onsen(a Japanese hot spring), Tabe-aruki (eating while walking), and much more. Specifically, Japan’s Table For One culture is growing in popularity exponentially. Many Japanese people are dining alone regularly. They see foreigners who visit are thoroughly enjoying the experience and not frustrated to be alone. It’s solo diners’ heaven, as many foreign solo travelers exclaim, “the Japanese food experience is one of the best memories

arrow_forward
Me Time Guide

Solo Travel & Living, Practical Tips From Japanese Local Solos

Japan is one of the safest countries in the world which makes it a great place and experience for a solo traveling getaway. Here are typical questions from international tourists, and we are going to answer them! Is traveling solo popular in Japan? Yes, from teenagers to elders, Japanese enjoy traveling, especially in solo settings. Even people who are married or living with a partner also enjoy traveling and dining solo… that is not a rare thing. Here are more articles about the Japanese way of living alone in Japan. Where can I enjoy traveling or dining solo in Japan? Many cafes, restaurants, and bars offer a table for one,

arrow_forward
Cultural Footprint

Creative Halloween Costumes Inspired by the Japanese 19th Century

Halloween is a Western culture, and it has been gaining mass participation in Japan, especially among the youth. In 1997, Tokyo Disneyland held the “Disney Happy Halloween” costume event, which led to the spread of this celebration in the country. It is said that the Disneyland event began Halloween to take roots in Japan, after candy manufacturers and apparel stores began to sell Halloween items. The original meaning of the concept of Halloween has almost been lost in this country, and it has become a more “costume event”. Many Japanese say that this is because Japan has had a cosplay culture since the Edo period (1603 – 1867). There seems

arrow_forward
Cultural Footprint Japanese Diaspora Life Style

South Korean Literature Brings Hope & Empowerment: K-book Store in Tokyo Chekccori

South Korean literature is increasingly popular amid the fourth wave of the Hallyu boom. Kim Seung-bok, who founded Cuon, a publishing company specializing in South Korean content, possesses a wide range of literary works. South Korea is considered both geographically the closest and yet one of the most distant countries from Japan due to its historical conflicts and divergent political views. On the other hand, there are many Japanese who enjoy visiting the country on vacation.  The younger Japanese generation is drawn to the Korean lifestyles and values through their exposure to K-pop, K-dramas, and movies. It is not surprising to encounter Japanese students, who diligently follow South Korean culture

arrow_forward
Japanese Diaspora

Your Story is Our Story: Uncovering the Little-known History of Japanese Americans

Portland, Oregon, once had a Japantown, where many Nikkei lived. We trace the past and present of Japanese Americans with Jana Iwasaki, a board member of the Japanese American Museum of Oregon. There are two places in Portland with deep ties to Japan. One is the Japanese American Museum of Oregon (JAMO), formerly known as the Oregon Nikkei Legacy Center, which has served as a community center and a place to educate and explore the Japanese American experience and its role in Oregon’s multicultural community. Visitors can find archival materials about Japantown as well as exhibits about World War II American concentration camps for people of Japanese descent.  The other

arrow_forward
Cultural Footprint Me Time Guide

Discover a Better Connection of You, Best Hiking Destinations

Mountains have long served a major role in people’s lives, providing water, food, and housing materials such as woods and rocks. Throughout history, mountains have also been an integral part of many of the world’s religions. From the ancient times of Japanese mythology to the present day, mountains have been important, and many have become spiritual spots. Many Japanese people want to visit the pilgrimage sites in Japan at least once in their lifetime. The following list is two of the three most sacred mountains in Japan, Mt.Tate, and Mt.Haku. The other one is Japan’s highest mountain, Fuji. Characteristics of Female Salvation: Mt.Tate (Toyama Prefecture) The most distinctive feature of

arrow_forward

Recent Posts

PAGE TOP